Early-Day Fasting Diet Could Be the Key to Reducing Your Risk of Diabetes

by Hiroshi Tanaka
2 comments
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New findings suggest that adopting an early-day fasting diet may significantly decrease the likelihood of developing type 2 diabetes. A collaborative study by the University of Adelaide and SAHMRI revealed that restricting eating to a specific window, from 8 am to 12 pm, for three days each week could yield greater benefits in reducing diabetes risk compared to a low-calorie diet alone. Despite both diets resulting in similar weight loss, the time-restricted fasting approach demonstrated enhanced glucose tolerance, increased insulin sensitivity, and reduced blood lipids, suggesting additional advantages beyond calorie restriction.

The study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of two dietary methods for individuals predisposed to type 2 diabetes: a time-restricted intermittent fasting regimen and a calorie-reduced diet. “Adopting a time-restricted intermittent fasting diet has the potential to lower the chances of developing type 2 diabetes,” stated Professor Leonie Heilbronn from the University of Adelaide’s Adelaide Medical School. After six months, participants who followed the intermittent fasting diet, fasting for three days per week and consuming food only between 8 am and 12 pm, exhibited greater glucose tolerance compared to those on a daily low-calorie diet. Moreover, they showed increased insulin sensitivity and experienced a greater reduction in blood lipids.

Type 2 diabetes arises when the body’s cells fail to respond adequately to insulin and the hormone loses its ability to regulate blood glucose levels. It is estimated that approximately 60 percent of type 2 diabetes cases could be delayed or prevented through dietary and lifestyle modifications. Presently, around 1.3 million Australians live with this condition, which currently has no cure.

The study involved over 200 participants from South Australia and spanned 18 months. Published in the scientific journal Nature Medicine, it represents the largest study to date focusing on how the body processes and utilizes glucose after a meal, which serves as a better indicator of diabetes risk than fasting tests. Xiao Tong Teong, a Ph.D. student at the University of Adelaide and the study’s first author, explained, “The outcomes of this study contribute to the growing body of evidence that suggests meal timing and fasting recommendations extend the health benefits of calorie-restricted diets, independent of weight loss, potentially influencing clinical practices.”

Further research is necessary to investigate whether similar benefits can be achieved with a slightly longer eating window, as this may enhance the long-term sustainability of the fasting diet.

Reference: “Intermittent fasting plus early time-restricted eating versus calorie restriction and standard care in adults at risk of type 2 diabetes: a randomized controlled trial” by Xiao Tong Teong, Kai Liu, Andrew D. Vincent, Julien Bensalem, Bo Liu, Kathryn J. Hattersley, Lijun Zhao, Christine Feinle-Bisset, Timothy J. Sargeant, Gary A. Wittert, Amy T. Hutchison, and Leonie K. Heilbronn, 6 April 2023, Nature Medicine. DOI: 10.1038/s41591-023-02287-7

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) about intermittent fasting diet

What is the key finding of the study on early-day fasting diet and diabetes risk?

The key finding of the study suggests that following a time-restricted intermittent fasting diet, specifically eating between 8 am and 12 pm for three days a week, may lower the risk of developing type 2 diabetes more effectively than a low-calorie diet.

How does the early-day fasting diet impact diabetes risk compared to a low-calorie diet?

Although both diets result in similar weight loss, the early-day fasting regimen improves glucose tolerance, increases insulin sensitivity, and reduces blood lipids. These effects offer potential benefits beyond calorie restriction alone and contribute to a lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

How prevalent is type 2 diabetes, and can it be prevented?

Type 2 diabetes affects a significant number of people, with nearly 1.3 million Australians currently living with the condition. It is estimated that approximately 60 percent of type 2 diabetes cases can be delayed or prevented through changes in diet and lifestyle.

How large was the study and where was it published?

The study involved over 200 participants recruited from South Australia and spanned 18 months. The research findings were published in the scientific journal Nature Medicine.

Is the early-day fasting diet suitable for everyone?

As with any dietary approach, it is recommended to consult with a healthcare professional before making significant changes to your diet. Individual factors and medical conditions should be taken into consideration when determining the suitability of the early-day fasting diet.

Are there plans for further research on this topic?

Further research is needed to explore if similar benefits can be achieved with a slightly longer eating window, which could enhance the long-term sustainability of the fasting diet. Continued investigation in this area may provide additional insights and refinements to the dietary recommendations.

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2 comments

FitnessJunkie June 14, 2023 - 12:41 pm

luv hearin about how intermittent fasting helps diabetics! impt to focus on diet & lifestyle changes. #healthjourney

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HealthNut23 June 14, 2023 - 10:17 pm

amazin research on diabeetes risk & early-day fastin!! impt info for ppl strugglin w/ health. #healthylifestyle

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