Revolutionary One-Atom-Thick Ribbons Set To Transform Batteries and Solar Cells

by Manuel Costa
4 comments
Nanoribbon Advancements

Researchers at the University College London (UCL) have achieved a significant breakthrough in the field of materials science with the creation of one-atom-thick ribbons composed of a phosphorus and arsenic alloy. These nanoribbons hold immense potential to revolutionize various technologies, including batteries, supercapacitors, and solar cells.

The journey began in 2019 when the UCL research team discovered phosphorus nanoribbons, often referred to as a “wonder material” due to their promising applications in devices ranging from batteries to biomedical sensors. However, one limitation of pure phosphorus nanoribbons was their poor electrical conductivity, which restricted their usability in certain applications.

In a recent study published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society, the UCL researchers addressed this limitation by incorporating tiny amounts of arsenic into the nanoribbons. This innovation allowed the newly created arsenic-phosphorus nanoribbons to conduct electricity effectively even at extremely low temperatures, down to -140 degrees Celsius, while retaining the desirable properties of pure phosphorus nanoribbons.

Dr. Adam Clancy, the senior author of the study, emphasized the potential of these alloyed nanoribbons. They have already demonstrated their ability to enhance the efficiency of perovskite solar cells by harnessing more energy from sunlight. Moreover, these nanoribbons exhibit magnetic properties, possibly arising from atoms along their edges, making them of interest for quantum computers.

Beyond their immediate applications, the study highlights the power of alloying in controlling the properties and potential of nanomaterials. This same technique could be applied to combine phosphorus with other elements like selenium or germanium, opening up even more possibilities in materials science.

For the realm of energy storage, the arsenic-phosphorus nanoribbons offer a compelling advantage. Unlike pure phosphorus nanoribbons that require the addition of a conductive material like carbon when used as an anode material in lithium-ion or sodium-ion batteries, the introduction of arsenic eliminates the need for carbon fillers. This enhancement not only increases the energy storage capacity of the batteries but also improves their charging and discharging speed.

In the context of solar cells, these nanoribbons can enhance the flow of electric charge, thereby boosting the efficiency of solar cells.

The production process of these nanoribbons involves mixing crystals formed from phosphorus and arsenic sheets with lithium dissolved in liquid ammonia at -50 degrees Celsius. After 24 hours, the ammonia is replaced with an organic solvent. The atomic structure of the sheets ensures that lithium ions can only move in one direction, leading to cracking and the formation of the nanoribbons.

One of the remarkable characteristics of these nanoribbons is their exceptionally high “hole mobility.” Holes, which are counterparts to electrons in electrical transport, move more efficiently through the material, facilitating the flow of electrical current.

Furthermore, these nanoribbons can be produced at scale in a liquid form, which makes them cost-effective for various applications.

This breakthrough in creating arsenic-phosphorus alloy nanoribbons with unique properties and wide-ranging potential applications marks a significant advancement in the field of materials science and technology. It holds promise for revolutionizing the way we store and harness energy and opens doors to new possibilities in quantum computing and beyond.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) about Nanoribbon Advancements

What are the key findings of the UCL research on nanoribbons?

The UCL researchers have successfully created one-atom-thick nanoribbons composed of a phosphorus and arsenic alloy. These nanoribbons exhibit enhanced electrical conductivity, making them suitable for various applications in batteries, supercapacitors, and solar cells. They also display magnetic properties, opening up possibilities for use in quantum computing.

How do these nanoribbons improve energy storage in batteries?

Unlike pure phosphorus nanoribbons, which require the addition of carbon as a conductive material in batteries, the introduction of arsenic in the alloyed nanoribbons eliminates the need for carbon. This improvement enhances the energy storage capacity of batteries and increases their charging and discharging speed.

What impact do these nanoribbons have on solar cells?

Arsenic-phosphorus nanoribbons enhance the flow of electric charge in solar cells, leading to increased efficiency in converting sunlight into electricity. This improvement can potentially contribute to more effective and efficient solar energy harvesting.

What is the significance of the high “hole mobility” in these nanoribbons?

The nanoribbons exhibit exceptionally high “hole mobility,” which refers to the speed at which holes (counterparts to electrons in electrical transport) move through the material. This high hole mobility enhances the efficiency of electrical current flow in devices, making them more effective in their intended applications.

Can these nanoribbons be produced at a large scale?

Yes, these nanoribbons can be produced at scale in a liquid form. This liquid form enables cost-effective application in various devices and applications, making them practical for industrial-scale production.

How was the production process of these nanoribbons carried out?

The production process involved mixing crystals formed from sheets of phosphorus and arsenic with lithium dissolved in liquid ammonia at a temperature of -50 degrees Celsius. After 24 hours, the ammonia was replaced with an organic solvent. This process resulted in the formation of the arsenic-phosphorus nanoribbons.

What other potential applications are there for these nanoribbons?

In addition to batteries, supercapacitors, and solar cells, these nanoribbons have potential applications in near-infrared detectors used in medicine and quantum computing due to their magnetic properties. The study also suggests that similar alloying techniques could be applied to combine phosphorus with other elements like selenium or germanium, opening up further possibilities in materials science.

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4 comments

CryptoQueen November 20, 2023 - 8:49 pm

Ths is mint news! Could nanoribbons be used in crypto mining or blockchain? Cool tech!

Reply
JournlStRprt November 21, 2023 - 1:42 am

wow! Reserchers @ UCL make crazy small ribbons, thts lit! elecricity stuff & sun power! quanticomputin’ too?

Reply
TechGeek45 November 21, 2023 - 10:38 am

High hole mobility = faster gadgets? Imprssive! Nanoribbons 4 the win!

Reply
BizExpert123 November 21, 2023 - 1:55 pm

Nanoribbons sound gr8 for energy storage. Cost-effctive too. Busines opprtunity here?

Reply

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