Astronomers Use Webb Telescope To Identify the Earliest Strands of the Cosmic Web

by Hiroshi Tanaka
5 comments
galactic filament

A team of astronomers from the University of Arizona has utilized the James Webb Space Telescope to identify a galactic filament stretching 3 million light-years in the early universe. This discovery sheds light on the formation and development of supermassive black holes by examining eight quasars and their impact on star formation. The findings, presented in two papers published in The Astrophysical Journal Letters, provide valuable insights into the fundamental structure of the cosmos.

By observing a threadlike alignment of ten galaxies that existed approximately 830 million years after the Big Bang, researchers uncovered a 3-million-light-year-long structure resembling pearls strung on an invisible thread. This filament, supported by a luminous quasar housing a supermassive black hole, is expected to evolve into a massive cluster of galaxies similar to the well-known Coma Cluster in the more recent universe. These groundbreaking observations represent the earliest-known filamentary structure associated with a distant quasar, offering a three-dimensional understanding of such phenomena at such an early cosmic era.

The arrangement of galaxies across the universe follows a coherent pattern, with galaxies congregating into clusters and filaments while separated by vast, empty voids. Referred to as the “cosmic web,” this interconnected network emerged gradually as gravitational forces attracted matter together. Galaxies, nestled within immense “oceans” of dark matter, form in regions where dark and regular matter accumulate in denser localized patches. Analogous to the crests of ocean waves, galaxies ride along continuous dark matter strings called filaments. The newly discovered filament represents the first observation of such a structure during a period when the universe was merely 6% of its present age.

The researchers were astounded by the length and thinness of the filament, as it exceeded their expectations. Their discovery is part of the ASPIRE project, a large-scale international collaboration led by the University of Arizona, aimed at studying the cosmic environments of the earliest black holes. By observing 25 quasars that emerged within the first billion years after the Big Bang, known as the Epoch of Reionization, ASPIRE seeks to understand the embedding of these early massive black holes within the context of cosmic structure formation.

The study also examined the properties of eight quasars in the young universe, confirming the existence of central black holes with masses ranging from 600 million to 2 billion times that of the Sun, only a billion years after the Big Bang. Scientists continue to investigate the mechanisms behind the rapid growth of these supermassive black holes. For these black holes to form within such a short period, two conditions must be met: they must originate from a massive “seed” black hole and rapidly accrete a million times more matter in a relatively brief timeframe. These observations provide unprecedented insights into the assembly of black holes, demonstrating their presence in massive young galaxies that serve as the fuel for their growth.

Moreover, the James Webb Space Telescope’s observations provide compelling evidence of how early supermassive black holes potentially influence star formation in their host galaxies. While these black holes accrete matter, they also generate powerful outflows of material called “winds.” These winds, extending far beyond the black holes themselves, have a significant impact on star formation by disrupting the collapse of gas and dust into denser clouds necessary for star formation. This discovery marks the first direct observation of such winds during the Epoch of Reionization, offering valuable insights into their scale and influence on galaxy evolution.

The research conducted by the University of Arizona astronomers, in collaboration with other institutions, significantly advances our understanding of the cosmic web’s formation, the early growth of supermassive black holes, and their impact on star formation in the early universe. These findings contribute to unraveling the mysteries of cosmic structure formation and the intricate interplay between black holes and galaxies.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) about galactic filament

What did astronomers discover using the James Webb Space Telescope?

Astronomers using the James Webb Space Telescope discovered a 3-million-light-year galactic filament from the early universe, providing insights into cosmic structure and the growth of supermassive black holes.

What is the significance of the discovered galactic filament?

The discovered galactic filament sheds light on the formation and evolution of cosmic structure. It represents one of the earliest filamentary structures associated with a distant quasar and offers a three-dimensional understanding of such phenomena in the early universe.

How did the James Webb Space Telescope contribute to the research?

The James Webb Space Telescope played a crucial role in this research by providing detailed observations of the galactic filament and its associated quasar. Its advanced capabilities allowed astronomers to explore the filament’s characteristics and study its implications for cosmic structure formation.

What insights were gained about supermassive black holes and star formation?

The study examined eight quasars and their influence on star formation. It confirmed the existence of central black holes with masses ranging from 600 million to 2 billion times that of the Sun, less than a billion years after the Big Bang. The research also provided evidence of how early supermassive black holes potentially regulate star formation through powerful outflows known as “winds.”

What is the ASPIRE project mentioned in the text?

The ASPIRE project is a large international collaboration led by the University of Arizona. It aims to study the cosmic environments of the earliest black holes. By observing 25 quasars that emerged during the Epoch of Reionization, ASPIRE seeks to understand the formation and embedding of these early massive black holes in the context of cosmic structure formation.

More about galactic filament

You may also like

5 comments

AstroNerd456 July 20, 2023 - 8:09 am

the cosmic web is like the ocean of dark matter with galaxies as the waves. this discovery is so imp. it’s the first time we see this kind of structure when the universe was so young! science is amazing, y’all!

Reply
SpaceEnthusiast99 July 20, 2023 - 11:55 am

ASPIRE project sounds epic! studying black holes and cosmic structure formation? count me in! can’t wait for more discoveries from the James Webb Space Telescope. the universe is full of surprises!

Reply
GalaxyWatcher22 July 20, 2023 - 1:20 pm

8 quasars and their effect on star formation? yes, pls! it’s crazy how massive black holes formed so fast. these new findings will help us understand how they grow. keep observing, astronomers!

Reply
CosmicExplorer33 July 20, 2023 - 9:47 pm

wow this is some cool stuff! astronomers found a super long galactic filament from the early universe using James Webb Space Telescope. it helps understand the cosmic web & growth of supermassive black holes!!

Reply
Stargazer123 July 21, 2023 - 12:57 am

omg! so like they saw a thread of galaxies lined up in the universe! they say it’s gonna turn into a huge galaxy cluster. i can’t believe they found this so early in the universe. mind-blowing!

Reply

Leave a Comment

* By using this form you agree with the storage and handling of your data by this website.

SciTechPost is a web resource dedicated to providing up-to-date information on the fast-paced world of science and technology. Our mission is to make science and technology accessible to everyone through our platform, by bringing together experts, innovators, and academics to share their knowledge and experience.

Subscribe

Subscribe my Newsletter for new blog posts, tips & new photos. Let's stay updated!

© 2023 SciTechPost

en_USEnglish