Scientists Have Determined the Cause of Lethal Climate Change That Occurred Millions of Years Ago

by Tatsuya Nakamura
5 comments
Astronomical Cycles

Scientists have determined the cause of deadly climate change events that occurred millions of years ago. Researchers have established a connection between mass extinctions and climate fluctuations spanning 260 million years and the occurrence of massive volcanic eruptions as well as Earth’s astronomical cycles. This investigation underscores the role of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions in driving climate change during these ancient periods and highlights the distinctiveness of these events compared to modern human-induced climate change.

New research has unveiled a profound link between Earth’s geological history and its celestial motions, extending beyond its internal processes. A team of scientists has concluded that the mass extinctions that unfolded over the past 260 million years, leading to severe environmental crises, were predominantly instigated by massive volcanic eruptions. These eruptions released substantial amounts of carbon dioxide into the Earth’s atmosphere, resulting in intense greenhouse-induced climate warming and conditions perilous to life on our planet.

Remarkably, these catastrophic events, occurring approximately every 26 to 33 million years, coincided with critical shifts in the Earth’s position within the solar system. These shifts followed recurring cyclical patterns, suggesting a synchronization between Earth’s geologic processes and astronomical cycles within the solar system and the Milky Way Galaxy. Michael Rampino, a professor at New York University’s Department of Biology and the senior author of the study, suggests that these celestial forces have converged repeatedly in Earth’s history, heralding profound alterations in climate.

It is essential to note that the conclusions drawn by these researchers do not pertain to the climate changes observed in the 20th and 21st centuries, which have been attributed to human activities. The periods of volcanic eruptions studied in this research occurred around 16 million years ago. However, their findings do support the well-established link between carbon dioxide emissions and global climate warming.

The study primarily focused on continental flood-basalt (CFB) eruptions, which are characterized by the largest lava flows on Earth, covering vast expanses of land. The researchers also examined significant geological occurrences over the past 260 million years, including ocean anoxic events (periods of oxygen depletion in Earth’s oceans), hyper-thermal climate pulses (rapid global temperature increases), and subsequent mass extinctions of marine and terrestrial life.

The study revealed a frequent coincidence between CFB eruptions and these deadly geological phenomena, underscoring the substantial impact of volcanic activity on Earth’s climate and ecosystems. The correlation with astronomy is underscored by the alignment of multi-million-year cycles of volcanic eruptions and extreme climate events with known orbital cycles of Earth within the solar system and the Milky Way galaxy.

The researchers assert that the level of agreement between geological and astrophysical cycles is too close to be attributed to chance alone. One outstanding question is the precise mechanism by which the astronomical movements of the planet perturb Earth’s internal geological processes.

In summary, this research has uncovered an unexpected connection, predicting a convergence of astronomy and geology. It suggests that events occurring on Earth are influenced by its astronomical environment, shedding light on the intricate interplay between celestial phenomena and Earth’s geological history.

Reference: “Cycles of ∼32.5 My and ∼26.2 My in correlated episodes of continental flood basalts (CFBs), hyper-thermal climate pulses, anoxic oceans, and mass extinctions over the last 260 My: Connections between geological and astronomical cycles” by Michael R. Rampino, Ken Caldeira, and Sedelia Rodriguez, 25 September 2023, Earth-Science Reviews. DOI: 10.1016/j.earscirev.2023.104548

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) about Astronomical Cycles

What is the primary cause of ancient climate crises mentioned in the text?

The primary cause of ancient climate crises discussed in the text is massive volcanic eruptions, which released significant amounts of carbon dioxide into the Earth’s atmosphere, leading to extreme greenhouse-induced climate warming.

How long do these catastrophic events, involving volcanic eruptions and climate change, occur?

These catastrophic events, characterized by volcanic eruptions and climate change, occur approximately every 26 to 33 million years, based on recurring cyclical patterns.

Does the research in the text have implications for modern-day climate change?

No, the research in the text specifically focuses on ancient climate crises that occurred millions of years ago and their causes. It does not have implications for modern-day climate change, which is primarily driven by human activities.

What are some of the geological phenomena examined in the research?

The research examines various geological phenomena, including continental flood-basalt (CFB) eruptions, ocean anoxic events (periods of oxygen depletion in Earth’s oceans), hyper-thermal climate pulses (rapid global temperature increases), and mass extinctions of marine and terrestrial life.

How does the text suggest a connection between Earth’s geology and astronomical cycles?

The text suggests a connection between Earth’s geology and astronomical cycles by demonstrating that these catastrophic events in Earth’s history coincide with changes in the planet’s position within the solar system. This alignment between geological processes and celestial cycles highlights the interplay between Earth’s geological history and its astronomical environment.

More about Astronomical Cycles

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5 comments

CuriousCat December 25, 2023 - 8:35 am

so, like, earth & space r bffs? wild! _xD83C__xDF0E__xD83C__xDF20__xD83E__xDE90_

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HistoryNerd December 25, 2023 - 12:02 pm

fascinatin insight on ancient catastrophes, our planet’s seen it all! _xD83D__xDCDC__xD83C__xDF0B__xD83C__xDF0F_

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EcoWarrior2023 December 25, 2023 - 12:37 pm

imp info abt past climate change but nothin on now, still, CO2 = bad! _xD83C__xDF3F__xD83D__xDEAB__xD83D__xDD25_

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JohnDoe23 December 25, 2023 - 3:41 pm

wow, amazin research abt ancient climate change & volcanos! gr8 connection btwn earth & space stuff _xD83C__xDF0B__xD83C__xDF0C_

Reply
ScienceGeek101 December 25, 2023 - 8:09 pm

this is mind blowin stuff! volcanos, CO2, and planet orbit, who knew? _xD83C__xDF0D__xD83C__xDF0B__xD83E__xDE90_

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